RClass

By default, from the perspective of GameLisp scripts, each rdata is a black box. GameLisp code can query whether a particular value is an rdata, receive rdata from function calls, pass rdata as function arguments... and that's about it!

If you prefer your scripting APIs to be a little more object-oriented, you can register an RClass ("Rust class") for any Rust type. When an rdata has an associated RClass, this will cause the rdata to behave like a GameLisp object. It can have methods and properties; its type can be queried using the is? function; and it has full support for operator overloading.

To register an RClass, use the RClassBuilder struct. The builder's api is designed to vaguely resemble a defclass form. We saw this API used earlier, for our Texture struct:


#![allow(unused_variables)]
fn main() {
RClassBuilder::<Texture>::new()
	.met("width", &Texture::width)
	.met("height", &Texture::height)
	.build();
}

You can register an RClass for any 'static Rust type, including types defined by external crates. The only restriction is that each RClass must have a unique name. If you have two types, one named audio::Clip and one named video::Clip, they can't both be named Clip.


#![allow(unused_variables)]
fn main() {
glsp::bind_rfn("Command", &Command::new::<String>)?;

RClassBuilder::<Command>::new()
	.met("args", &|command: &mut Command, rest: Rest<String>| {
		command.args(rest);
	})
	.met("status", &Command::status)
	.build();
}
(let command (Command "ls"))
(ensure (is? command 'Command))
(.args command "-l" "-a")

; spawn the process and wait for it to complete
(.status command)

Weak Roots

Generally speaking, it's fine to move any 'static type onto the GameLisp heap. However, there's one exception.

When a Root smart pointer is pointing to an object, it will entirely prevent that object from being deallocated. This means that if any Root pointers are moved onto the garbage-collected heap (for example, by storing a Root in a struct which is passed to glsp::rdata), memory leaks will occur. The Val and RRoot types may contain Roots, so those types should also be kept off the heap.

If you need a pointer from one heap allocation to another, you should use Gc instead. Gc is a weak reference; it doesn't prevent its pointee from being deallocated, and so it won't cause any memory leaks.

Unfortunately, Gc does require a little bit of supervision. Because Gc pointers are weakly-rooted, this means that the object they're pointing to could be deallocated at any time! To prevent this from happening, you'll need to:

  • Use RClassBuilder::trace to specify how the garbage collector should visit each of the Gc pointers owned by your Rust type.

  • Call glsp::write_barrier when an instance of your Rust type has been mutated, so that the garbage collector can check whether any new Gc pointers have been added to it.


#![allow(unused_variables)]
fn main() {
//don't do this! 
struct Colliders {
	array: Root<Arr>
}

impl Colliders {
	fn get(&self) -> Root<Arr> {
		Root::clone(&self.array)
	}

	fn replace(&mut self, new_array: Root<Arr>) {
		self.array = new_array;
	}
}

RClassBuilder::<Colliders>::new()
	.met("get", &Colliders::get)
	.met("replace!", &Colliders::replace)
	.build();
}

#![allow(unused_variables)]
fn main() {
//instead, do this...
struct Colliders {
	array: Gc<Arr>
}

impl Colliders {
	fn get(&self) -> Root<Arr> {
		self.array.upgrade().unwrap()
	}

	fn replace(&mut self, new_array: Root<Arr>) {
		self.array = new_array.downgrade();
	}

	fn trace(&self, visitor: &mut GcVisitor) {
		visitor.visit(&self.array);
	}
}

RClassBuilder::<Colliders>::new()
	.met("get", &Colliders::get)
	.met(
		"replace!",
		&|colliders: RRoot<Colliders>, new_array: Root<Arr>| {
			colliders.borrow_mut().replace(new_array);
			glsp::write_barrier(&colliders.into_root());
		}
	)
	.trace(Colliders::trace)
	.build();
}

We also provide GcVal as a weakly-rooted alternative to Val, and RGc as a weakly-rooted alternative to RRoot.

Make sure you don't get caught out when constructing an rfn! If your rfn is a Rust closure which captures a Root, Val or RRoot, then you're effectively moving a Root onto the GameLisp heap, which will cause the captured data to leak. (Of course, for an rfn which is bound to a global variable, a memory leak might be acceptable.)


#![allow(unused_variables)]
fn main() {
let primes: Root<Arr> = arr![2, 3, 5, 7, 11];
primes.freeze();
let closure = move || { Root::clone(&primes) };

glsp::bind_rfn("primes", Box::new(closure))?;
}